Raven/Killer Whale Bracelet

United States
  • Raven/Killer Whale Bracelet by Amos Wallace, Sterling Silver
  • Raven/Killer Whale Bracelet
$275.00
Item No. N777B
Qty:

Amos Wallace was one of the outstanding Tlingit carvers, a member of the Raven Moiety. This sterling silver bracelet, done in the distinctive Tlingit style, shows a double raven in the center section with a killer whale at the ends. The bracelet width is 1⅛ inches, the devolved length is 6½ inches. Made in USA.

Amos Wallace was one of the outstanding Tlingit carvers, a member of the Raven Moiety. This sterling silver bracelet, done in the distinctive Tlingit style, shows a double raven in the center section with a killer whale at the ends. The bracelet width is 1⅛ inches, the devolved length is 6½ inches. Made in USA.

  • Raven
    The most important of all creatures to the Northwest coast Indian peoples was the Raven. He took many forms to many peoples -- the Transformer, the cultural hero, the trickster, the Big Man. Full of magical powers, the Raven could transform himself into anything. He put the sun in the sky, the fish in the sea, the salmon into the rivers. His antics were often motivated by greed, and he loved to tease, to cheat, to woo, and to trick.
  • Orca
    Whales, a common motif in the art of the Northwest Coast peoples, were the subject of countless stories and legends. One story held that a whale could capture a canoe and drag it and the people aboard down to an underwater Village of the Whales. These people were then transformed into whales themselves. The Haida believed that whales seen near villages were these drowned people trying to communicate with the villagers.

    A Tlingit legend tells that the first orcas (killer whales) were carved from yellow cedar and sent into the ocean with instructions to be friendly towards people. The killer whales guide the Indians towards fish and are helpful except when they are treated discourteously.

  • Amos Wallace

    Amos Wallace was born in Juneau, Alaska in 1920, a Tlingit of the Raven Moiety. His early years were in Hoonah, Alaska after which he attended schools in Skagway and Wrangell. In 1942 he joined the US Army during Japans invasion of Alaska. Honorably discharged in 1945, he returned to Juneau where he lived until his death in 2004.

    Amos started carving at the age of seven and developed his artistic skills throughout his life, carving totem poles and large plaques. 1958 brought him national fame and many of his totem poles still stand today at museums across the country. He was also a master silversmith and jeweler. During his later years he shared his knowledge of Tlingit art through teaching and apprenticeships.

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