Brush Tail Possum Dreaming Cuff Bracelet (WAR07)

Australia
$150.00
Item No. D1058BC
Qty:

The Brush Tail Possum Dreaming artwork on this bracelet is by Australian Indigenous artist Steven Jupurrurla Nelson. The photoanodized aluminum cuff bracelet is 1¼ inches wide at the ends and 1¾ inches wide in the center. The reverse side of the bracelet is eucalypt. Made of photoanodized aluminum. Hand crafted in Australia.

The Brush Tail Possum Dreaming artwork on this bracelet is by Australian Indigenous artist Steven Jupurrurla Nelson. The photoanodized aluminum cuff bracelet is 1¼ inches wide at the ends and 1¾ inches wide in the center. The reverse side of the bracelet is eucalypt. Made of photoanodized aluminum. Hand crafted in Australia.

  • Brush Tail Possum Dreaming

    The site depicted in this Water Dreaming painting by Julie Nangala Robertson is Pirlinyarnu (Mt. Farewell), about 165 km west of Yuendumu in the Northern Territory. The "kirda" (owners) for the water dreaming site are Nangala/Nampijinpa women and Jangala/Jampijinpa men.

    Two Jangala men, rainmakers, sang the rain and unleashed a giant storm that collided with another storm from Wapurtali at Mirawarri. A "kirrkarlanji" (brown falcon) carried the storm further west from Mirawarri. The two storms travelled across the country from Karlipirnpa, a ceremonial site for the water dreaming near Kintore that is owned by members of the Napaljarri/Japaljarri and Napanangka/Japanangka subsections. Along the way the storms passed through Juntiparnta, a site that is owned by Jampijinpa men.

    The storm eventually became too heavy for the falcon. It dropped the water at Pirlinyarnu where it formed an enormous "maluri" (claypan.) A "mulju" (soak) exists in this place today. Whenever it rains today, hundreds of "ngapangarlpa" (bush ducks) still flock to Pirlinyarnu.

    In contemporary Warlpiri paintings, traditional iconography is used to represent the "Jukurrpa" (dreaming) associated sites and other elements. In many paintings of this dreaming, short dashes are often used to represent "mangkurdu" (cumulus and stratocumulus clouds) and longer, flowing lines represent "ngawarra" (flood waters.) Small circles are used to depict mulju and river beds.

  • Occulture

    Created by designer Lisa Engeman, Occulture is a collaboration with Australian indigenous artisans transferring ancient stories and knowledge into contemporary statement jewelry that celebrates and strengthens the songline of culture, knowledge, artists and community. The photoanodized aluminum jewelry with sterling silver or gold-filled fittings is handcrafted in Australia using cutting edge technology.

    Occulture is deeply honored to represent the artists they work with, the Warlukurlangu people of the Yuendumu region of the central Australian desert, Gamilaraay woman, Arkeria Rose Armstrong, and a lineage of well-known and respected artists from Utopia and Yuelumu country, including Raymond Walters Japanangka.

    The jewelry designs reproduce highlights from artists' paintings. Made by hand, each piece possesses unique, intrinsic beauty with variations in shape, size, and metal finish. The jewelry translates ancient artwork into a contemporary context by utilizing cutting-edge technology to create Occulture's sculptural designs.

    Occulture is a preferred supplier for the Museum Shops Australia and New Zealand and a member of the Indigenous Art Code which promotes and regulates the fair and ethical trade in works of art by Indigenous artists. All artwork featured in their jewelry is licensed and royalties are paid directly to the individual artist. Occulture also proudly holds an Australian Made license.

    Each piece of Occulture jewelry is gift boxed, with a card describing the artist and the artwork.

  • Steven Jupurrurla Nelson
    Steven Jupurrurla Nelson was born 30 August 1978 in Alice Springs, NT. He is a lifelong resident of Yuendumu, a remote Aboriginal community approximately 300 kilometers north-west of Alice Springs. He was raised by his late mother, Nora Nungarrayi Jurrah, and his stepfather, Frankie Jakamarra Nelson. His father, John Jampijjinpa Brown, was a resident of Papunya. Steven has two siblings from the same mother. His brother, Greg Jupurrurla Wood, lives in Uluru and is a ranger. His sister, Roslyn Napurrurla Gibson, is deceased.

    Steven began painting at Warlukurlangu Artists Aboriginal Corporation in late 2014 after working at the art centre for some time. He typically paints 'janganpa Jukurrpa' (brush-tail possum Dreaming) from his mother's side. His country is located near Nyirrpi, another remote Aboriginal community approximately 170 kilometers west of Yuendumu. His mother's and grandfather's country is also in this area. His mother's country includes the Nginyirrpalangu outstation. His grandfather, Banjo Patterson, owned country that includes Ngarupalya.

    All artwork featured in the Occulture jewelry is licensed and royalties are paid directly to the individual artist. For more information about Steven Jupurrurla Nelson and his artwork please visit warlu.com.

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