Lovebirds (Eagle) Dog Tag,Copper

United States
$82.00
Item No. NC42080RT
Qty:

Express your affection for a spouse or loved one by sharing a pair of Eagle and Raven (Lovebirds) dog tags. The pair of tags display the lovebirds within a heart shape in this sophisticated design by Odin Lonning. The 1½ x ⅞ inch tags also work great as a single Eagle, shown here with a sharply curved beak, or Raven Dog Tag. The reverse side is plain, suitable for engraving by your local jeweler. The dog tag is copper with a 24 inch copper ball chain. Made in USA.

Express your affection for a spouse or loved one by sharing a pair of Eagle and Raven (Lovebirds) dog tags. The pair of tags display the lovebirds within a heart shape in this sophisticated design by Odin Lonning. The 1½ x ⅞ inch tags also work great as a single Eagle, shown here with a sharply curved beak, or Raven Dog Tag. The reverse side is plain, suitable for engraving by your local jeweler. The dog tag is copper with a 24 inch copper ball chain. Made in USA.

  • Lovebirds
    Haida and Tlingit Indians have two main clans, the Eagles and the Ravens. Traditionally, members of the same clan cannot marry, so marriages typically signify the joining of an eagle to a raven. Eagle and Raven, when linked together, are consequently known as the Lovebirds. The Lovebirds are a popular design for items such as bracelets and rings, given as gifts between couples of these clans.
  • Odin Lonning

    Odin Lonning (Tlingit name SH NOW TAAN) was born in Juneau, Alaska. He is Woosh Ke Taan (Eagle/Shark) Clan through his Tlingit mother. He is named after his Norweigian father.

    At age ten, Odin saw his first traditional dance performance. This motivated him to explore Tlingit art. Local native artists such as Lincoln and Amos Wallace, Johnny Avatok, and Nathan Jackson inspired him, along with the culture centers and museums in Ketchikan, Haines, and Sitka.

    In 1989 Odin attended the Institute of American Indian Art in Santa Fe, New Mexico. While in Santa Fe, he collaborated with another artist to form Wolfsong Arts. They exhibited in larger powwows, juried invitationals, and museum shows throughout the West and Midwest.

    Seeking a deeper understanding of the culture essential to his artwork, Odin started dancing and learning traditional songs. He first danced with the Juneau Tlingit Dancers in 1992, and later with Seattle-based Ku-Tee-Ya Dancers. He currently dances with Xudzidaa Kwaan dance group of Angoon, Alaska.

    Odin lives on Vashon Island near Seattle , where he works on multiple projects and private commissions, does cultural presentations like Keet Shu-ka with his partner for nonprofit groups, museums, schools, galleries, and treatment centers.

  • Eagle
    The Eagle is one of the most powerful and important symbols in Pacific Northwest Indian art and life. Eagle down, a symbol of peace and friendship, was sprinkled before guests in welcome dances and on other ceremonial occasions; eagle feathers were used in many rituals and worn on masks, headdresses and dance aprons.

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