Sea to Sky Platter, Large

by Boma
Canada
$52.00
Item No. B307-L
Qty:

The Sea to Sky Collection of nesting platters is a collaboration between Corrine Hunt and Boma Manufacturing. Each piece expresses an element of air, sea or land along with an animal familiar to that element. This large platter, "Sharing the Spirit in Everyone" expresses the sea theme with a killer whale. Corrine likens her work to poetry, where a few simple lines can evoke a rich sense of place. Varying depths of relief add a three dimensional look. The resulting piece is modern, yet evocative of Corrine's First Nation heritage. 16 x 7 inches. Recycled glass. Made in Canada.

The Sea to Sky Collection of nesting platters is a collaboration between Corrine Hunt and Boma Manufacturing. Each piece expresses an element of air, sea or land along with an animal familiar to that element. This large platter, "Sharing the Spirit in Everyone" expresses the sea theme with a killer whale. Corrine likens her work to poetry, where a few simple lines can evoke a rich sense of place. Varying depths of relief add a three dimensional look. The resulting piece is modern, yet evocative of Corrine's First Nation heritage. 16 x 7 inches. Recycled glass. Made in Canada.

  • Corrine Hunt
    Born in Alert Bay British Columbia in 1959, Corrine has been creating contemporary art that reflects the themes and traditions of her First Nations Komoyue and Tlingit heritage since 1985.

    Corrine's works include engraved gold and silver jewelry and accessories, custom furnishings in carved stainless steel and reclaimed wood, modern totem poles and other sculptural installations. She codesigned the medals for the 2010 Vancouver Olympics and Paralympics.

    We are pleased to offer the Sea to Sky Collection, a collaboration between Corrine Hunt and Boma Manufacturing.

    For more information on Corrine and her art, please visit www.corrinehunt.ca

  • Orca
    Whales, a common motif in the art of the Northwest Coast peoples, were the subject of countless stories and legends. One story held that a whale could capture a canoe and drag it and the people aboard down to an underwater Village of the Whales. These people were then transformed into whales themselves. The Haida believed that whales seen near villages were these drowned people trying to communicate with the villagers.

    A Tlingit legend tells that the first orcas (killer whales) were carved from yellow cedar and sent into the ocean with instructions to be friendly towards people. The killer whales guide the Indians towards fish and are helpful except when they are treated discourteously.

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